All Theses, Dissertations, and Capstone Projects

Year of Award

1988

Degree

Master of Business Administration (MBA)

College

College of Business & Professional Studies

Degree Program

Business

Department

Business Administration

Keywords

solar energy, kilowatts, engineering, economic, environment

Abstract

Photovoltaic array systems are direct converters of solar energy into electrical energy. They have been made a reality by man's understanding of the quantum mechanical operation of semiconductors, the building blocks of modern computers and electronic devices. In the past thirty years, photovoltaic (solar) array systems have grown in size from less than one watt to hundreds of kilowatts of electrical output power. Costs of photovoltaic technology have been decreasing rapidly. This has made photovoltaic electrical power generation affordable for use in remote area applications, despite the recent worldwide fall in energy prices. However, most residential photovoltaic array systems are not yet economical when compared to the cost of energy generated using conventional fossil-fuel sources.

This thesis presents a basic overview of the major aspects and engineering variables of photovoltaic energy generation technology. It also provides a limited analysis of same of the factors such as government policies, consumer perceptions, and environmental issues which may affect the future adoption of this technology.

Finally, a block diagram of a standalone residential photovoltaic system using commercially available components is presented which provides for the energy requirements of my house. The purchase and installation costs of this proposed design is evaluated and the economic viability of such a system is analyzed.

Comments

This thesis was selected for its superior quality, and was suggested as a good example for MBA students to follow.

Document Type

Restricted Thesis

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
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