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Year of Award

1992

Degree

Master of Business Administration (MBA)

College

College of Business & Professional Studies

Degree Program

Business Administration

Department

Business Administration

Keywords

racism, discrimination, harrassment, career, children, employment, management

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to evaluate African American women and their struggle in Corporate America.

First, it is mandatory to cut through the myths and stereotypes surrounding America's black woman in order to examine both the special problems they have had to face and the truly extraordinary contributions they have made to our society.

It must also be understood that work has always been a major part of African American women's legacy. From Sojourner Truth's day to this, the burden of African American women has been a heavy one. Though African American women's history has been a history of steady labor force participation, African American women's legacy has been low-paid, unstable work in the service sector.

Traditionally, African American women earnings have made significant contributions to the incomes of their families. This has been the case for husband-wife families as well as for households with female heads. The participation rate in the labor field has not increased as fast as that of white women in spite of the fact that African American females have the characteristics economists have found that encourage participation the most.

Education in or of itself, however if not the total solution to the problem because education yields lower returns to African American women with limited schooling than is true for comparable whites.

This research will unlock the trials and trivialisms that African American women have had to overcome, in order, to climb the hierarchical ladder in Corporate America to achieve success.

Document Type

Restricted Thesis

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Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
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