Theses, Dissertations, and Capstone Projects

Year of Award

1992

Degree

Master of Business Administration (MBA)

College

College of Business & Professional Studies

Degree Program

Business Administration

Department

Business Administration

Keywords

gender, sexual harassment, stereotypes, employees, workers

Abstract

The presented thesis will chronicle and examine the transition that is taking place in female/male work relationships in American organizations.

Significant changes have occurred in the status of and interactions between women and men at work in recent years. In fact, some believe that all the changes which need to take place have already done so and that a person’s sex no longer has any effect on what happens to at work.

According to many people now entering the work force, the days when women had trouble getting into jobs compared with men are long past. Gender issues have not entirely disappeared from the workplace, however.

The purposes of this thesis are (a) to examine critically female/male work relationships and (b) to recommend ways for individuals and organizations to respond properly.

The presented thesis addresses workplace entry issues for women and men as well as issues that arise during employment. The thesis examines issues pertaining to individuals at different developmental stages; in work groups; organizations, and society as a whole. It considers what it is like for men and women to work with others as peers, to manage others, and to be managed.

In so doing, the thesis offers managers two types of information. First, it provides insight on how they relate to the managerial role; how they conduct themselves as managers and how they respond to managerial actions by others. Second, it provides further insight into how other employees related to each other and conducted themselves in their own work roles, whether managerial or nonmanagerial.

Document Type

Restricted Thesis

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